Space

Did you know China has a telescope on the Moon?

Did you know China has a telescope on the Moon? The 15-centimeter telescope was delivered to the moon aboard the Chang’e 3 lunar lander which landed on the moon in December 2013.  In the photo above, the small arrow points to the Chang'e 3 rover and the big arrow points to the Chang'e 3 lander and telescope base. If you’ve looked through a telescope before, you know that because of the earth’s rotation, the stars do not stay fixed in the viewfinder for very long. Since the moon rotates 27 times more slowly than Earth, the scope is much easier to stay fixed on stars.  The scope sees in ultraviolet light too, a big advantage for any telescope outside of the earth’s atmosphere. The telescope is remote…
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Science Photos

Cool science pictures that make you go “huh?”

It is said that a picture is worth a thousand words.  In these interesting science pictures, they are worth a single word – “huh?”.  Check out the cool science pictures below.  If they don’t cause you to scratch your head in wonder, they will at least put things in perspective. The sun in a different light This picture of the sun was taken using a different wavelength filter giving us an entirely different perspective.   How big is the moon? The surface area of the moon is million square kilometers.  How big is that?  Here’s a true-scale image of the United States superimposed over the moon.   How do astronauts eat in space? Below is a food tray used aboard the Space Shuttle.  Notice the…
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Space

Watch what happens when astronauts on the moon drop a hammer and feather at the same time

For a long time, Reeko has been trying to convince his readers that despite mind-boggling implications, Galileo was correct – all objects fall at the same rate regardless of how heavy they are. In other words, mass does not affect gravitational pull. Theoretically, in a vacuum, if you dropped a school bus (yes, yes, imagine the principal inside if you really must add dramatic effect) and a feather from a tower, both would hit the ground at the same time (and the principal would be very unhappy). Wait – don’t leave yet! We’re not making this stuff up! In 1971, on his last day on the moon, Apollo 15 Commander David Scott tested this theory. In one hand, he took a heavy geological hammer. In…
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