Inertia/Momentum

Rock and roll records that just won’t swing

An old record (or CD) demonstrates gyroscopic principles Gyroscopic inertia - a strange, complicated word - is a force common all around us. It explains how we are able to ride a bike, how planes navigate, and how a figure skater is able to do those lightening fast spins. Here's a simple experiment that'll clear up this confusing concept. Note: the hardest part of this experiment is going to be finding one of those old LP records. Tie one end of the string to the middle of a matchstick or pencil. Pull the other end of the string through the center of a LP record (so the matchstick is centered underneath the hole). Swing the record back and forth like a pendulum in smooth, even…
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Geometry

Where inside and outside are one and the same

Mobius strip experiment Think you've seen it all. Just when you thought you understand the simple little concepts like up and down, forwards and backwards, and inside and outside, Reeko comes along and throws a curve ball at ya' - in this case, a curved piece of paper that will blow your mind. Cut a 2 inch strip of paper. Holding the strip out straight, give it a half twist (180 degrees) and attach the two ends together. Take a pen and draw a line along the center of the strip. Surprised? Where do you end up? Is the line drawn on the inside or outside of the paper? Now cut the strip along the line you drew. How many chains do you get? Your…
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Geometry

Super hero egg shells

Super hero egg shells Ever wonder why igloos are dome shaped and not square? Ever been amazed at how a suspension bridge can hold the weight of hundreds of passing cars with little or no apparent support underneath it? This experiment demonstrates how arches are used in architecture not only for aesthetic appeal but for a very useful and needed Carefully break off the small end of four eggs and pour out the insides.  If you're worried about wasting perfectly good eggs uhhh, Reeko's heard they're good for your Wind a piece of cellophane tape around the center of each eggshell. Cut through the center of the tape to make four dome-shaped shells (discard the broken end of each shell). Lay the four domes on…
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Floatation

The homemade pen cap sinker

Make a pen cap sinker to demonstrate Pascal’s law Fill the plastic bottle with water. Attach a piece of clay to the arm of a plastic pen cap. Put the cap in the bottle so that it floats. Put the lid on the bottle and tighten so that it does not leak any air. Squeeze the sides of the bottle. What do you think causes the pen cap to sink when you squeeze the sides of the bottle? By squeezing the bottle, you increase the pressure inside, thus forcing more water up into the pen cap. The added water in the cap increases its weight and causes the cap to sink. A submarine works along these same principles. If the average density of the submarine…
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Floatation

Principles of Flotation science experiment

What makes a heavy ship float? How does a boat or ship carrying hundreds of pounds worth of stuff float while that same stuff would sink to the bottom of the ocean if dumped overboard? How come when you're in a pool and you stretch your body out flat you float. But, if you wrap your arms around your legs and curl up into a ball you sink? Well, it all has to do with how much water is pushing against you and a little scientific principle called buoyancy or floatation. When you stretch out flat more water pushes against you since your body is laid out flatter. When you curl up into a ball, less water is pushing against you. Want to test this…
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Floatation

Make a homemade Lava Lamp experiment

Make a homemade Lava Lamp Lava lamps were very popular in the 1970’s. For some reason, your parents thought it was very fun to sit there and watch colorful liquid in a bottle swirl aimlessly around. They probably even chanted “Oh wow, the colors, the colors.” They became popular again a few years ago but as we know, kids today are much smarter, and thought that lava lamps were cool because they knew they demonstrated the scientific principles of immiscible liquids (liquids that just won’t mix). In this science experiment, we’ll create a real working lava lamp and explain to your parents why they really should be thought of as cool. Fill a glass jar with 3 inches of water or until it is 2/3…
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Floatation

Floating eggs in salt water experiment

Floating eggs in salt water Density is a measure of how much matter takes up a certain amount of space or volume. The more matter you can pack into a certain space, the denser it is. Although we often confused the two, density and weight are actually two different measurements. Weight is defined as the mass of an object times the force of gravity. In our world where we have gravity forcing things downward, a denser object will be heavier too. Clear as mud? Well, let’s do this experiment and at least make it as clear as, err… salt water. Since density is defined as how much matter takes up a certain amount of volume, we can take ordinary water, add salt to it, and…
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Cohesion

The ‘Am I Dense’ experiment

The 'Am I Dense' experiment In our floating experiment, we touched on the topics of buoyancy. But in reality, flotation is also affected by other scientific principles as well. Here, let Reeko Pour one-third cup of syrup into the glass jar. Now pour one-third cup of cooking oil into the jar. Finally, pour one-third cup of water into the jar. Let the contents settle for a few minutes. Drop a piece of plastic, a grape, and a small cork into the liquid. Notice how the objects you dropped in settle down to different layers of the mixture. The liquids have different densities. The most dense (syrup) will be at the bottom, the least dense (oil) will be at the top, with the water in between.…
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Cohesion

Super bouncing bubbles science experiment

Super bouncing bubbles Reeko loves bubbles - all kinds of bubbles. Reeko loves chomping a big glob of bubblegum and blowing bubbles the size of baseballs (and as a kid, used to giggle with glee as his mother struggled to cut the gum from his hair). Reeko loves making bubbles in the bathtub using the "natural" bubble-maker method (if you haven't mastered the natural bubble-maker method, eat beans, it helps). And of course, the science behind bubbles is quite amazing too. Bubbles that you find in liquids are simply air that is trapped inside the liquid. Soap bubbles work on the similar principle but with a bit more complexity. The surface area of a liquid, like water, has a certain "surface tension". Surface tension makes…
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Cohesion

Sticky water

The stickiness of water experiment Yep, it' true. Water has a certain 'stickiness' to it. Read Make five holes in the side of the can (using the nail). Make sure the holes are made near the base of the can. Fill the can with water. Pinch the streams of water together with your thumb and finger. The streams of water are held together by the water's "stickiness," or surface tension. Surface tension is the tendency of the surface of a liquid to behave as though covered with a skin. This is due to the cohesive forces between the molecules at and near the surface. Not sure what's going on here? Check out the instructions here! Experiment Supplies Supplies: Coffee can
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